Dish good for your bottom line and your bottom

By Richard Nunn, Morning meteorologist, rnunn@wjxt.com
Published On: Apr 15 2013 03:26:18 PM EDT
Updated On: Apr 12 2013 09:05:42 AM EDT

Two ways to cook fish that are quick and easy on the waistline.

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -

From the very first episode of Culinary Nunnsense, I had requests for some "light" meal ideas. These requests were usually framed with the words beach, bathing suit or shorts. 

You asked. I listened. 

Not only am I watching out for your bottom line; I am also looking out for your bottom.

In this segment we focus in on a couple of techniques that use very little fat, feature fish and are quick, light and easy.

The fish I used is tilapia, but you can use any fish you like. For instance when I make these dishes at home I will use what ever is on sale: halibut, flounder, catfish and Luvbug's favorite, trigger fish.

Dish No. 1 is an easy pan sauté method, with a light crunch with the help of corn starch. Dish two is classic en papillote (French for "in paper") method.
Also featured in these dishes some fresh veggies.Today we used yellow squash, zucchini and some red bell pepper.

For dish one I blanched the vegetables so they would cook in about the same time as the sautéed fish. In dish two we let the natural steam in the En Papillote method cook the veggies.

En Papillote is a method of cooking in which the food is put into a folded pouch or parcel and then baked. The parcel is typically made from folded parchment paper, but other material, such as a brown paper bag or in our case aluminum foil. The parcel holds in moisture to steam the food.

Extra moisture for fish or even chicken can be added. Sources such as water, wine or stocks and broths can be used.

This method is most often used to cook fish or vegetables, but lamb and chicken can also be cooked in this method. Your choice of herbs, seasonings and spices depend on your particular recipe being prepared.

More important than the ingredients inside is the folding of the pouch. Make sure all folds are well sealed to keep in the steam and flavor.

Which ever method you choose, with your own added flavor, your favorite fish and veggies, I think once you fold, flip or sauté, you will agree there is Nunn better.

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