Heat advisory for NE Florida, SE Georgia

By Crystal Moyer, Morning assignment desk, backup traffic reporter, cmoyer@wjxt.com
Vic Micolucci, General assignment reporter, vic@wjxt.com
Published On: Aug 06 2014 11:37:22 AM EDT
Updated On: Jul 28 2014 07:31:17 PM EDT

VIDEO: With temperatures as high as the mid 90's it may feel like 105 outside which sparks concern for our health. Liquids are key to keeping your body hydrated with spiking temps.

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -

A heat advisory is in effect for southeast Georgia and the northern tier of northeast Florida Monday due to the combination of hot temperatures and high humidity, according to the National Weather Service in Jacksonville.

The heat advisory will be in effect from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. for the following counties: Hamilton, Suwannee, Columbia, Baker, Nassau, Duval, Clay, St. Johns, Putnam, Flagler, Coffee, Jeff Davis, Bacon, Appling, Wayne, Atkinson, Ware, Pierce, Brantley, Glynn, Echols, Clinch, Charlton and Camden counties.

A heat advisory means that a period of heat indices between 108 and 112 degrees is expected. The combination of hot temperatures and high humidity will combine to create a situation in which heat illnesses are possible.

Monday temperatures are expected to be in the upper 90s. The heat index is estimated to be around 108 degrees.

These conditions will increase the risk of heat-related illnesses such as heat exhaustion or heat stroke.

Weather experts advise people in these areas to drink plenty of fluids, stay in an air-conditioned room, keep out of the sun, if possible, and check up on relatives and neighbors who may be affected.

Not everyone has that luxury. Those working outside know how brutal it can be in this heat. Even just taking the dog for a walk is sweat-provoking.

As an idea, a patch of asphalt was measured at over 140 degrees Monday; the hood of a car hit 167.

The sweltering heat can be dangerous. Nurses at Memorial Emergency Center in Julington Creek said they've seen more people coming in with heat-related illnesses.

"A lot of cramping that's going on, nausea, vomiting, people having headaches," said registered nurse Anne Marie Hale.

With high temperatures and humidity, it doesn't take long to get dehydrated and overheated.

"Especially with lots of kids out nowadays during the conditioning for sports, they need to make sure that their parents give them more fluids before they even start," Hale said.

Broken air conditioners are a common theme with the heat.

"When the system is working continuously, things begin to heat up and parts begin to fail," said Scott Wilson, president of Howard Services Inc.

Howard Services is getting a record number of calls for emergency repairs.

"We are extremely busy," Wilson said. "All of our technicians are working early in the morning until late in the evening."

Experts say keep when you're at home or work, keep your blinds down and your windows and doors closed. Even leaving the door open for a little bit could strain your AC unit for hours and run up your electric bill big time.

And, of course, never leave your kids or pets in the car, not even for a minute.

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