Naturalization ceremony held in Jacksonville

By Joy Purdy, 5:30, 6:30 and 11 p.m. anchor, jpurdy@wjxt.com
Elizabeth Berry, Evening assignment manager, beth@wjxt.com
Published On: Apr 15 2014 11:12:14 PM EDT
Updated On: Apr 15 2014 11:47:27 PM EDT

During a small, intimate setting inside the Mandarin Library on Kori road Tuesday afternoon, 56 people became citizens of the United States.

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -

During a small, intimate setting inside the Mandarin Library on Kori road Tuesday afternoon, 56 people became citizens of the United States. Immigrants from 26 countries took the Oath of Allegiance afternoon.

United States Citizenship and Immigration Services Jacksonville Field Director Lisa Bradley conducted the ceremony and administered the Oath of Allegiance for the immigrants. Steven Sharpe, from Argentina, was among those naturalized.

“To be honest ,I was a bit teary-eyed, but it’s an emotional moment. I was so very proud," Sharpe said. "I’m very happy and I’m surrounded by my family, which always makes it equally important for me."

“I really like it when we can do it here in the library," said Library Director, Barbara Gubbin. "It’s a smaller group, you can meet these people and talk to them and learn something about them, so I think it’s very special,"

Among the smiles at the Mandarin Public Library Tuesday was Director Barbara Gubbin’s. The Oath of Allegiance was a pledge she took not too long ago.

“I looked for hope and a future and found a wonderful future here and I’m very proud of that,” said Gubbin.  “And so yes, it made it a very emotional moment that I was sharing with them.”

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