World War II veteran receives long-awaited high school diploma

By Francine Frazier, Web news editor, ffrazier@wjxt.com
Rob Sweeting, Anchor, rsweeting@wjxt.com
Published On: Jun 02 2014 10:55:04 PM EDT
Updated On: Jun 02 2014 11:29:17 PM EDT

A 90 year old World War Two veteran proves it's never too late to live out one of your biggest goals.

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -

With the help of his daughters, 90-year-old Jack Koolik received something Monday that had been missing from his life for 71 years — a high school diploma.

Koolik left high school in 1942 to join the U.S. Army Air Corps, which later became the Air Force, and fight in World War II, and he never received his high school diploma.

On Monday, Koolik took his place on stage at the Times-Union Center with students from Darnell-Cookman Middle/High School, where his daughter, Bonnie Sandler, works.Jack Koolik receives diploma

Sandler had learned about a program implemented last year by the Florida Legislature that makes it possible for people like Koolik to receive their diploma, if they left school to join the military and were honorably discharged. She and her sisters took advantage of the program for their father.

“It's a wonderful thing my kids did for me,” Koolik said.

Sandler said her school graciously agreed to honor her father during Monday's graduation ceremony.

“Your commitment to our country and your service in combat is a model for us all,” Sandler told her father during the ceremony. “We thank you for serving our country so courageously... congratulations.”

Koolik left high school in Brooklyn, New York, a little over 71 years ago. He was assigned to a radar unit looking for low-flying planes during World War II. During his military service, Koolik, who has been living in Jacksonville since 1990, received several medals, including the World War II Victory Medal and the American Service Medal.

“I left high school to go to war to keep the country at peace,” Koolik said. “Everybody's hand joined together (and) we had a victory.

“I feel very proud to be an American. I wish the boys wouldn't be losing their lives.”

After the war, Koolik returned home, got married and life got in the way, so he never went back to get his diploma — until Monday.

“(It's) wonderful,” he said. “Like a dream world.”

Comments

The views expressed below are not those of News4Jax or its affiliated companies. By clicking on "Post," you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and your comment is in compliance with such terms. Readers, please help keep this discussion respectful and on topic by flagging comments that are offensive or inappropriate (hover over the commenter's name and you'll see the flag option appear on right side of that line). And remember, respect goes both ways: Tolerance of others' opinions is important in a free discourse. If you're easily offended by strong opinions, you might skip reading comments entirely.

blog comments powered by Disqus